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NIJ Journal Issue No. 276

NCJ Number
249218
Date Published
Author(s)
National Institute of Justice
Publication Series
NIJ Journal
Annotation
This NIJ Journal issue features articles on fighting crime with forensic science; the impact of foreclosure on neighborhood crime rates; research on using isotopes to identify victims; NIJ’s support of emerging scientists; evaluating the Los Angeles County Elder Abuse Forensic Center; testing potential for adopting a nonblaming practice in the criminal justice system; and using research to move policing forward.
Abstract
This NIJ Journal issue presents seven original articles. The first article, “Fighting Crime With Science,” describes how NIJ research and development projects hold promise for significantly improving forensic science disciplines. The second, “Looking for the Link: The Impact of Foreclosures on Neighborhood Crime Rates,” reports on three NIJ-funded studies that can help community stakeholders better understand the complex relationship between foreclosures and crime levels in neighborhoods. The third, “Tracking Movements With Isotopes,” reports on work by NIJ-supported researchers who are using oxygen and strontium isotopes to help law enforcement identify victims. The forth, “NIJ Funding: Supporting Emerging Scientists, Building Our Future,” an influential scientist reflects on the pivotal role that NIJ funding has played during his prolific career in forensic science. The fifth, “Evaluating the Los Angeles County Elder Abuse Forensic Center,” reports on NIJ-funded evaluations that show that the multidisciplinary model refers more elder abuse cases to the district attorney and the Office of the Public Guardian. The sixth, “Testing a Concept and Beyond: Can the Criminal Justice System Adopt a Nonblaming Practice?,” describes how NIJ’s Sentinel Events Initiative explores the potential for a culture-changing review of errors to improve the criminal justice system. The final article, “Using Research to Move Policing Forward,” a 2014 LEADS scholar explains how his agency uses evidence-based research to reduce crime and better help the public.
Date Created: January 27, 2016