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Multimedia Listing

Crime File: Drug Trafficking

January 1986

In this Crime File video, James Q. Wilson moderates a panel of three (Mark Kleiman, Harvard University Research Fellow; Mark Moore, Harvard University Professor; and John Lawn, Administrator of the United States Drug Enforcement Agency), this team discusses Federal and local enforcement strategies against drug trafficking.

Crime File: Neighborhood Safety

January 1985

One of the series of videos from the 'Crime File' public affairs program, this video on neighborhood safety mainly uses a panel interview to describe, evaluate, and identify success factors for police-citizen crime prevention programs; programs considered include citizen patrol, block watch, police 'storefront' services, and police door-to-door contact with citizens.

Crime File: Victims

January 1985

1985

One of the series of videotapes from the 'Crime File' public affairs program, this video on victims uses a panel interview and other interview segments in considering crime victims' needs and attitudes, victim compensation, victim impact statements, and measures for improving victim services.

Crime File: Deadly Force

January 1985
This Crime File video considers the rationales and consequences of various police policies on the use of deadly force, using an interview panel and tape segments pertaining to the New York City Police Department's policy and training on the use of deadly force as well as the Memphis Police Department's (Tennessee) policy in this area.

Crime File: Exclusionary Rule

January 1984

This video, in the Crime File series, presents background material on some U.S. Supreme Court decisions pertinent to the use of the exclusionary rule in sanctioning illegal police searches and seizures (Mapp v. Ohio and Shepherd v. Massachusetts); the moderator, James Q. Wilson, poses questions to Professor Yale Kamisar, University of Michigan Law School, and D. Lowell Jensen, Associate Attorney General, U.S. Department of Justice, designed to probe the controversial implications of the exclusionary rule.

Crime File: Inside Prisons

January 1984

This video, in the Crime File series, portrays a three-member panel discussing prison conditions in Texas both before and after a 1980 court order for the reform of prison management practices, implications of the Texas experience for prison management, and lessons for prison management to be drawn from the experiences of the experimental Federal correctional facility in Butner, N.C.

Crime File: Repeat Offenders

January 1984

This Crime File video describes the Repeat Offender Program (ROP) of the Washington, D.C., police department and a similar program that targets young offenders in Mecklenburg County, N.C. A panel discusses these programs and constitutional issues involved in their operation.

Crime File: Out on Bail

January 1984

This video, number 5 in the Crime File series, portrays a 3-member panel discussing the rate of rearrests among persons on pretrial release, features of the 1984 Federal bail law designed to prevent the pretrial release of dangerous persons, ways to reduce rearrests of pretrial releasees, and constitutional issues raised by preventive detention.

Crime File: Insanity Defense

January 1984

This video, in the Crime File series, delineates the issues associated with the insanity defense, with a particular focus on the John Hinckley, Jr., case. Three panelists are questioned by the moderator regarding the parameters of the insanity defense as it has been used and has recently been redefined in some States.

Crime File: Heroin

January 1984

1984

This video, in the Crime File series, portrays a panel discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of criminalizing heroin use, with particular attention to contrasting the British and American systems for controlling heroin use.

Crime File: Sentencing

January 0084

This Crime File video portrays three panelists contrasting indeterminate sentencing in Massachusetts, determinate sentencing in Minnesota, and discussing the existence and causes of sentencing disparity, sentencing factors, and racial discrimination in sentencing.