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WHO BUYS STOLEN PROPERTY? A NEW LOOK AT CRIMINAL RECEIVING

NCJ Number
143140
Journal
Journal of Crime and Justice Volume: 16 Issue: 1 Dated: (1993) Pages: 75-95
Author(s)
P F Cromwell; J N Olson; D W Avary
Date Published
1993
Length
21 pages
Annotation
A field research study was conducted to examine the role of the nonprofessional fence in initiating and sustaining property crime.
Abstract
Interviews with six fences, 30 thieves, and 19 ordinary citizens who knowingly bought stolen property were supplemented with an analysis of official police records regarding the distribution of stolen property by burglars and shoplifters during 1989. Findings indicated that "direct marketing" to the ultimate consumer and to part-time and amateur fences is more common than previously believed. Although nonprofessional receivers such as juveniles, inexperienced thieves, or drug addicts do not purchase with the frequency, volume, or commitment of the professional fence, they appear to represent a large market for stolen goods, compensating for lack of volume with their sheer numbers. Findings also led to the development of a typology consisting of the following six levels of fences: (1) professional fences, (2) part-time fences, (3) associational fences, (4) neighborhood hustlers, (5) drug dealers who barter drugs for stolen property, and (6) amateurs. Notes and 20 references

Date Published: January 1, 1993