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Race Group Differences in Prison Victimization Experiences

NCJ Number
239691
Date Published
October 2012
Length
12 pages
Author(s)
Benjamin Steiner, John Wooldredge
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored
Annotation
This study investigated the level of prison victimization among different racial groups, specifically African-Americans and White, non-Latino inmates.
Abstract
This study found that White, non-Latino inmates were at a greater risk for prison victimization than were African-American inmates. Specifically, victimization rates involving physical assaults were 8 percent for Whites compared to 6 percent for Black inmates, while victimization rates involving property thefts were 29 percent for White inmates compared to 21 percent for Black inmates. This study investigated the level of prison victimization among different racial groups, specifically White, non-Latino inmates and African-American inmates. Data for the study were obtained from a sample of 2,403 African-American inmates and 3,150 White inmates drawn from all State prisons in Ohio and Kentucky and all private prisons in Ohio. The data was analyzed in order to estimate race-specific models of the prevalence of victimization by assault and property theft. The findings indicate that the odds of victimization in prison are much for White, non-Latino inmates compared to African-American inmates. The study also found that several factors played a role in the level of victimization for the two groups, namely, age, sex, education, family status, officer legitimacy, custody score, and visitation. Implications for policy are discussed. Tables, notes, and references
Date Created: September 30, 2012