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Policy and Training Recommendations Related to Police Use of CEDs: Overview of Findings From a Comprehensive National Study

NCJ Number
241279
Date Published
Author(s)
Geoffrey P. Alpert, Roger G. Dunham
Annotation
This article presents and interprets findings from various components of the comprehensive national study of conductive energy devices (CEDs) and to formulate policy and training recommendations.
Abstract
The authors report the policy and training recommendations derived from a comprehensive national study that examined conductive energy device (CED) use, resulting injuries, departmental policies and training, and reports from officers, trainers, and suspects concerning CED incidents. The overall purpose of the national project was to examine CED use from a variety of methods. Although the specific analyses and findings from each of the different methodologies are published separately, the authors integrate the findings of the various components of the study, and from the general literature, into a comprehensive set of policy and training recommendations. This article helps one understand how and why injuries occur to police and citizens during these use-of-force events and recommends a comprehensive set of policies and principles for training police officers on CED use. The major conclusions address not only the importance of CEDs to law enforcement but also the potential for abuse of CEDs by the police, and how such abuse can be avoided. Abstract published by arrangement with Sage Journals.
Date Created: December 30, 2010