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Implementing the Next Generation of Parole Supervision: Findings from the Changing Attitudes and Motivation in Parolees Pilot Study

NCJ Number
304755
Author(s)
Erin Jacobs; Valentine Louisa Treskon; Cindy Redcross
Date Published
May 2018
Length
46 pages
Annotation

This report presents the findings and methodology of the Changing Attitudes and Motivation in Parolees (CHAMPS) study, which examined the implementation of a pilot of one parole-based intervention known as the Next Generation of Parole Supervision (NG), which was introduced in each of the cities of Dallas, Denver, and Des Moines.

Abstract

The goal of NG is to improve parolee outcomes by providing parole officers with the knowledge and strategies needed for conducting effective regular supervision meetings with parolees. This implementation evaluation used a range of qualitative and quantitative data, including assessments of the knowledge and skills of parole officers trained in NG compared with a second group of officers who continued with parole practices used prior to the introduction of NG. The evaluation found that although there was some variation in policies and practices across sites, parole officers in the CHAMPS sites generally were already familiar with many of the concepts of NG, so changes in officers’ supervision practices were limited. Only in Dallas did NG-trained parole officers engage in practices that were substantially different from those observed among untrained officers. The results in Dallas suggest that coaching may be important in the effective implementation of an intervention that involves changing parole officers’ skills and practices. Changes became more noticeable once coaching was introduced; however, despite coaching for the entire study period in Des Moines and Denver, little change was observed in these cities. Overall, this study indicates that parole officers are amenable to changes to improve supervision practices; however, consistent implementation of changes in policy and practices is challenging. 7 figures, 2 tables, and 28 references

Date Published: May 1, 2018