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Assessing the Relationship Between Police Use of Force and Inmate Offending (Rule Violations)

NCJ Number
252256
Date Published
November 2017
Length
29 pages
Author(s)
Charles F. Klahm IV; Benjamin Steiner; Benjamin Meade
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored
Publication Type
Research (Applied/Empirical), Report (Study/Research), Report (Grant Sponsored), Program/Project Description
Grant Number(s)
2011-IJ-CX-0003
Annotation
This study assessed the effects of exposure to police use of force on inmates' odds of offending in prison, using survey data collected from a national sample of inmates.
Abstract
The study found, net of relevant controls, prisoners subjected to police violence were more likely to engage in assaultive and other rule- violating behavior, especially those who did not resist police authority. Consistent with the cycle of violence hypothesis, these findings suggest violence perpetrated by legal authorities produces similar effects to exposure to violence in general. Moreover, the consequences of police use of force are especially problematic when the recipient fails to perceive his or her treatment was fair, which supports the theoretical perspective on procedural fairness and legitimacy. Policy implications are discussed. (Publisher abstract modified)
Date Created: July 20, 2021