U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Assessing the Impact of Harassment by Peers: Incident Characteristics and Outcomes in a National Sample of Youth

NCJ Number
252427
Date Published
Author(s)
Heather A. Turner, Kimberly J. Mitchell, Lisa Jones, Anne Shattuck
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored
Annotation
Since few studies have empirically assessed the characteristics of peer bullying that most affect its impact, the study reported in this article addressed this research gap by using a nationally representative U.S. sample of youth ages 10–20 to examine the relative effects of a variety of potentially aggravating incident characteristics on emotional, physical health, and school-related outcomes.
Abstract
Study findings provide support for power imbalance and duration (a stronger predictor than repetition) as incident characteristics that exacerbate the negative impact of peer harassment; however, several other incident characteristics have substantial effects with or without the presence of these qualities. Injury, sexual content, involvement of multiple perpetrators, and hate/bias components of peer harassment incidents each increased at least one negative outcome. Findings point to several features of peer harassment that can provide a basis for prioritizing victimization experiences in greatest need of intervention efforts. (Publisher abstract modified)
Date Created: December 3, 2019