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Episode 40: 2018 IPTES: Just Talking Testimony

April 2018

This online audio (Episode 41 of the Just Science podcast series) features an interview with Nancy Crump, an Assistant Crime Laboratory Administrator with the Phoenix Police Department (Arizona), who discusses the creation and operation of her agency's Field Identification Drug Officer Program (FIDO).

Why Is There an Evidence Backlog?

December 2017
An influx of funding and improvements in efficiency can help reduce backlogs for forensic evidence, but if the capacity of labs does not continue to increase to keep up with demand, evidence will continue to pile up.

Just Wrong: The Aftermath of Wrongful Convictions

October 2017

The strength of our criminal justice system depends on its ability to convict the guilty and clear the innocent. But we know that innocent people are sometimes wrongfully convicted and the guilty remain free to victimize others. The consequences of a wrongful conviction are far-reaching for the wrongfully convicted and the survivors and victims of the original crimes. 

How to Encourage a Culture of Officer Safety

July 2017
Jeff Rojek, Associate Director for the Center for Law and Behavior at the University of Texas, explains what the research shows about why law enforcement officers are more or less likely to use seat belts.

NIJ's Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science (LEADS) Program — Departing Class

June 2017
In this video, law enforcement officers discuss how NIJ’s Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science (LEADS) scholar program benefits professional development and provides the opportunity to network with academia and share research with other agencies to improve evidence-based policing. In addition, law officers discuss how the LEADs scholar program equips smaller agencies to improve community relations.

How Best Protect Your Force Against Officer Suicide

May 2017
John Violanti, Research Professor at Buffalo, discusses the importance of making police departments aware that officer suicide is a problem. According to Violanti, police officers have a significantly higher rate of suicide than the general public. Reasons for this higher risk include the accumulative effects of trauma and stress.

Violanti describes steps police agencies are taking to help police officers, including teaching recruits what they may experience on the job.

Improving Officer Safety in Interactions With Citizens Suffering From Mental Illness

May 2017
Cara Altimus, former ASSS Fellow with NIJ, discusses the importance of law enforcement and first responders understanding mental illness, its causes, and how it affects the brain. She speaks about the correlation between drug addiction and mental illness. Altimus also addresses establishing procedures and systems so that police officers and first responders can safely and successfully interact with individuals with drug addiction and/or mental illness.

Understanding the Effects of Fatigue on Law Enforcement

May 2017
Steven James (Assistant Research Professor, Washington State University, College of Medicine) and Lois James (Assistant Professor, Washington State University, College of Nursing) discuss research on how fatigue and sleep deprivation affect officers when they make critical decisions to use deadly force. The researchers also discuss how often law enforcement officers are fatigued, the impacts of officer fatigue and drowsy driving, and the goal of implementing positive changes.

Safety, Health, and Wellness Solicitation Webinar, FY 2017

March 2017

This webinar will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to the National Institute of Justice's Research and Evaluation of Drugs and Crime FY 2017 solicitation. The presenters will discuss the purpose and goals of this funding opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude this webinar.

Research to Improve Officer Decision-Making, Solicitation Webinar (FY 2017)

March 2017

This webinar will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to NIJ’s Research to Improve Officer Decision-making solicitation. The presenters will discuss the purpose and goals of this opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude this webinar.

Research and Evaluation on Drugs and Crime, FY 2017 Solicitation Webinar

March 2017

This webinar will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to the National Institute of Justice's Research and Evaluation of Drugs and Crime FY 2017 solicitation. The presenters will discuss the purpose and goals of this funding opportunity and address frequently asked questions. A Q&A session will conclude this webinar.

Examining Police Officer Crime

February 2017
Dr. Philip Stinson, Bowling Green State University, discusses the findings of his research on crimes committed by police officers.

Based on the research findings, law enforcement officers appear to commit crimes at a much lower rate than the general public. However, in some cases, at times due to the stressors of the job and frequent exposure to trauma and violence, officers engage in misconduct or criminal behavior.

Police Officer Crimes and Police Integrity

February 2017
Dr. Philip Stinson, Bowling Green State University, discusses the findings of his research on crimes committed by police officers.

However, in some cases, at times due to the stressors of the job and frequent exposure to trauma and violence, officers engage in misconduct or criminal behavior. The National Institute of Justice understands what’s at stake for public safety and officer wellness when we ignore warning signs of officers struggling with occupational hazards and other psychological hardships.

The National Sexual Assault Policy Symposium

February 2017

Learn about the NIJ National Sexual Assault Policy Symposium held in September 2016 from its audience members and organizers. The Symposium focused on how the nation is moving forward and finding solutions to the complex issues that arise in sexual assault cases and in testing sexual assault evidence.

Funding Opportunities for Publicly Funded Crime Labs, Fiscal Year 2017

January 2017

This webinar will inform the audience of the changes to three programs available for publicly funded forensic laboratories and introduce a new program for FY 2017. Changes to existing programs will be highlighted and presenters will discuss the background and goals of the solicitations, recommendations for successful applications, application expectations and requirements, the review process, and the application checklist. There will also be time for questions and answers at the end of the webinar.

Solicitations discussed include:

Meet the Fellow: Translational Criminology

January 2017
In this video Jessica Shaw, Ph.D., describes her work as a translational criminology fellow at NIJ. She discusses what motivated her to apply, her fellowship experience and how it impacted her career development, as well as, the benefits of pursuing a fellowship with NIJ.

Looking at the Impact on Policing of Body Worn Cameras

January 2017

Dr. Craig Uchida, Justice & Security Strategies, Inc., discusses the importance of using research to examine the impact of body-worn cameras. He leads an NIJ-supported project to evaluate the use of body-worn cameras by law enforcement to determine if they improve police behavior and relationships with the community.

NIJ Forensic Science R&D for Criminal Justice Purposes Program, Fiscal Year 2017

January 2017

January 2017

This webinar will provide details and guidance for potential applicants to the National Institute of Justice's (NIJ) Forensic Science Research and Development for Criminal Justice Purposes Program. This program seeks proposals in basic or applied research, and development to support forensic science disciplines. The purpose and goals of the forensic science R&D program will be discussed and frequently asked questions regarding this funding opportunity will be addressed. A Q&A session will conclude this webinar.

Understanding the Science-Practice Gap

December 2016
In this video Jessica Shaw, Ph.D., describes what she learned about the science-practice gap while working as a translational criminology fellow at NIJ. She discusses what the science-practice gap is, how research intermediaries work to bridge that gap, how organizations and individuals can have gaps, and the importance of interdisciplinarity.

Preventing Gun Violence: Understanding Law Enforcement Response and Improving Multi-disciplinary Partnerships for Peace

November 2016

This Research for the Real World seminar explores common police practices for responding to gun violence and the extent to which they are contributing to reductions in violent incidents. The panel will also explore the role of multi-disciplinary partners such as the public health sector in reducing gun violence, and discuss promising practices for law enforcement partnerships to leverage complimentary violence reduction efforts.

Using Research to Understand Cyberbullying

October 2016
Dr. Megan Moreno, Center for Child Health, Behavioral and Human Development at Seattle Children’s, discusses how important it is to have a common definition of cyberbullying in order to develop effective prevention and intervention programs. She leads a NIJ-supported research project to help us understand cyberbullying among children and teens.

Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men

October 2016
This video describes the findings of a National Institute of Justice (NIJ) supported study on the prevalence of violence against American Indian and Alaska Native women and men. Specifically, the study provides estimates of sexual violence, physical violence by intimate partners, stalking, and psychological aggression by intimate partners over the lifetime of American Indian and Alaska Native women and men as well as victimization estimates over of the past year (based on 2010 data).

Find School Safety Programs on CrimeSolutions.gov

October 2016
Dr. Stephanie Gerstenblith, Development Services Groups, discusses how to use CrimeSolutions.gov to find evidence-based programs and practices that can improve school safety. Many of these programs were added to CrimeSolutions.gov under NIJ’s Comprehensive School Safety Initiative.

Dr. Gerstenblith also addresses the lack of strong evaluations of school safety programs that schools are implementing and invested in; and the opportunity that presents for the research community.