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Police Officer Deaths in the United States, 1980-2007

Description

Contrary to what most people think, more officers die as a result of accidents than criminal assaults.

Felonious Deaths. In 1980, there were 23.7 felonious police officer deaths per 100,000 sworn officers. In 1981, the number dropped to 20.5. It stayed the same in 1982 and then dropped to 17.8 in 1983. In 1984, the number decreased to 15.4, but in 1985, it increased to 16.6. In 1986, the number of felonious deaths dropped to 13.9 and then rose to 15.4 in 1987. In 1988, the number climbed to 16.1. In 1989, it declined to 13.3; in 1990 to 12.6. The number increased to 13.3 in 1991 and then decreased to 11.6 in 1992. In 1993, the number of felonious deaths rose to 12.6; in 1994 to 14.1. It went back down to 12.6 in 1995 and to 10.2 in 1996. In 1997, the number increased to 11.3. In 1998, it decreased to 9.5; in 1999 to 6.6. In 2000, the number climbed to 7.8; in 2001 to 10.6. It dropped to 8.4 in 2002 and to 7.8 in 2003. In 2004, the number of deaths rose to 8.5, then dropped to 8.1 in 2005, and dropped again in 2006 to 7.0. In 2007, it rose back up to 8.1.

Accidental Deaths. In 1980, for every 100,000 sworn officers, 13.9 police officers died from accidental causes. The number rose to 14.9 in 1981, to 16.0 in 1982 and 1983, and to 16.1 in 1984. In 1985, it declined to 14.9; in 1986 to 14.1. In 1987, the number of deaths climbed to 15.4 and then to 15.9 in 1988 and 1989. In 1990, the number dropped to 12.8. It dropped again in 1991 to 9.9, but it increased to 12.1 in 1992. In 1993, the number decreased to 10.7, but it climbed to 11.0 in 1994. In 1995, it dropped to 10.1; in 1996 to 8.7. The number of accidental deaths rose to 10.2 in 1997; in 1998 to 12.6. It went back down to 10.2 in 1999, but then increased to 12.7 in 2000. In 2001, the number declined to 11.5; in 2002 to 11.3. It rose to 12.1 in 2003 and to 12.2 in 2004. In 2005, it dropped back down to 9.9 and then dropped again to 9.7 in 2006. In 2007, it climbed up to 11.9.