U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Violent Repeat Victimization: Prospects and Challenges for Research and Practice

NCJ Number
238727
Author(s)
Janet L. Lauritsen
Date Published
April 2012
Length
14 pages
Annotation
This video and its transcript feature a presentation on the topic, "Violent Repeat Victimization: Prospects and Challenges for Research and Practice," as part of the NIJ Research for the Real World Seminar.
Abstract
The presenter is Janet Lauritsen of the University of Missouri at St Louis, who discusses her research on the causes and consequences of victimization, the social and historical content of crime and victimization, and quantitative research methodologies. She is currently conducting an analysis of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey to measure patterns and trends in repeat victimization. Her presentation focuses on what is currently known about repeat victimization and the prospects and challenges for developing a better understanding of the issue in order to reduce violence. She begins with a brief overview of the research, which includes some of the research in the United States and abroad. Her focus is on repeat violence. Her analysis of data from the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) facilitates an analysis of the levels and trends in repeat violence at the national level. She examines the extent to which repeat victimization plays a role in national rates of violence, as well as how this may have changed over time. Also, findings are presented to show how repeat victimization influences the levels and trends in some types of violence that most often includes repeat events, such as intimate-partner violence (IPV) against women and school-related violence against youth. In addition, the survey data show how victims who experience violence in one time period are at risk for violence in a subsequent time period. This provides insight into how some types of violent victimization predict future risk.

Date Published: April 1, 2012