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Protecting Our Protectors: Using Science to Improve Officer Safety and Wellness Brochure

NCJ Number
242159
Date Published
Author(s)
National Institute of Justice
Agencies
NIJ
Publication Type
Brochure
Annotation
This brochure from the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, provides information for police and first responder agencies to improve officers’ safety while on the road.
Abstract
This brochure was prepared by the National Institute of Justice, Office of Justice Programs with input from police and first responder agencies from around the country. The primary focus of the brochure is to show how agencies can use science to improve officers’ safety while on the road. The brochure contains a list of recommendations based on research looking at ways to improve officer safety. These recommendations include use of high intensity lights during the day to improve visibility, use of blue lights, use of retroreflective material to improve visibility of emergency vehicles, and use of different colors of lights to distinguish between vehicles parked in the normal traffic path and those near the path but not obstructing it. Additional research shows that the use of body armor by officers on the street decreases the likelihood that they will suffer a fatal injury. The brochure also highlights research showing how the use of conducted energy devices (CEDs) in use-of-force incidents can reduce the risk of injury to both officers and suspects when compared to other alternative methods. The final section of the brochure highlights research on the benefits to officers of switching to 10-hour work shifts over the normal 8-hour or compressed 12-hour shifts.
Date Created: May 10, 2012