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Just Wrong: The Aftermath of Wrongful Convictions

NCJ Number
251175
Date Published
October 2017
Author(s)
Tomeshia Artis; Gloria Killian; Fernando Bermudez; Peggy Carter; Gary Drinkard; Christy Sheppard
Agencies
NIJ
Publication Type
Presentation (Multimedia), Issue Overview, Interview
Annotation
In this video and its transcript, six individuals impacted by wrongful convictions - some who are victims and survivors in such cases and some who have been exonerated - share the needs they have experienced as a result of a wrongful conviction.
Abstract
A rape survivor involved in a wrongful conviction shares her anxiety and fear for herself and her children, knowing that the rapist has yet to be identified, convicted, and sentenced. An exoneree struggles with her self-esteem, constantly reminding herself she is not a criminal. Another exonoree talks about his obsession with proving to his children that he is a good father, with his wife believing he goes to extremes. Victims and survivors also express anger and anxiety at feeling no one is being held accountable for their victimization, which diminishes their self-worth and that of a murdered family member. Family members of exonerees talk about their mistreatment at work and in their communities before the wrongful conviction was determined. Exonorees also mention the disrespect and cruelty they experienced in the criminal justice system, with some believing their cases were mishandled by investigators and the prosecution. Other feelings of exonerees pertain to lost time with children and other family members that cannot be recovered.
Date Created: October 3, 2017