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Understanding and Measuring Bias Victimization Against Latinos

NCJ Number
253430
Date Published
Author(s)
Carlos A. Cuevas, Amy Farrell, Jack McDevitt, Sheldon Zhang, Jeff Temple, Jesenia Robles, Sarah Lockwood
Annotation
This report presents the results of a study that utilized a community-based survey to provide information about the nature and pattern of bias motivated victimization among Latinos.
Abstract
This study utilized a community-based survey to provide information about the nature and pattern of bias motivated victimization among Latinos, with particular emphasis on understanding bias motivated crimes against immigrants. The researchers sought to answers five key questions: 1. What is the nature and pattern of bias motivated victimization among immigrant and non-immigrant populations residing in high Latino population communities? 2. How frequently and in what ways does bias motivated victimization occur with other forms of victimization in immigrant and non-immigrant populations residing in high Latino population communities? 3. How often and in what ways do those immigrant and non-immigrant victims who experience bias motivated victimization report their victimization and/or seek help through formal and informal mechanisms? 4. What are cultural factors that potentially contribute to bias victimization risk? And, 5. does bias victimization have a unique contribution to negative psychosocial outcomes associated with victimization generally? This study significantly advances the understanding of the nature and patterns of bias motivated crime victimization among immigrant and non-immigrant Latinos, a community of victims that have historically been difficult to reach through traditional victimization survey mechanisms. The researchers found that experiencing bias is widespread in the Latino community, with over half of the study population experiencing bias events and 28% experiencing hate crimes in their lifetime.
Date Created: October 20, 2019