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NIJ Journal Issue No. 271

NCJ Number
240695
Date Published
Author(s)
National Institute of Justice
Publication Series
NIJ Journal
Annotation
This February 2013 edition of the NIJ (National Institute of Justice) Journal contains seven primary articles dealing with policy-relevant research results and initiatives.
Abstract
The first article, Predicting Recidivism Risk: New Tool in Philadelphia Shows Great Promise discusses a computerized system used by the Philadelphia Police Department to predict which probationers are more likely to reoffend. The second article, Ballistic Body Armor: A closer Look at the Follow-Up Inspection and Testing Program, discusses a NIJ program that helps ensure the recently produced body armor meets the requirements of NIJ’s standards. The third article, The Grant Progress Assessment Program: Looking Back on Success and Moving Forward discusses the NIJ program that educates grantees on how to properly administer their grants. The fourth article discusses the work of Kristen Zgoba who received the Peter P. Lejins Research Award. The fifth article, Sex Offenders Monitored by GPS Found to Commit Fewer Crimes discusses the results of a research project that examined the impact of GPS monitoring on the recidivism rates of sex offenders in California. The sixth article, Ending Modern-Day Slavery: Using Research to Inform U.S. Anti-Human Trafficking Efforts discusses a study that examined the challenges facing the criminal justice system in its efforts to combat human trafficking. The seventh article, The Pitfalls of Prediction, presents reasons why the criminal justice system should take advantage of the latest scientific developments to make reliable predictions.
Date Created: February 28, 2013