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Long-Term Effects of Law Enforcement's Post-9/11 Focus on Counterterrorism and Homeland Security

NCJ Number
232791
Date Published
December 2010
Length
177 pages
Author(s)
Lois M. Davis; Michael Pollard; Kevin Ward; Jeremy M. Wilson; Danielle M. Varda; Lydia Hansell; Paul Steinberg
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored
Publication Type
Report (Study/Research)
Grant Number(s)
2007-IJ-CX-0012
Annotation
This study examined the long-term adjustments that large urban law enforcement agencies have made to accommodate the renewed focus on counterterrorism and homeland security as well as the advantages and challenges associated with it.
Abstract
The findings from the study fall under five areas: (1) the evolution of law enforcement's counterterrorism (CT) function. Nine years after 9/11, law enforcement agencies' information-sharing networks have evolved to include CT and the adoption of an all-crimes approach, with the intent to strike a balance between criminal intelligence and intelligence related to terrorist threats; (2) organizational adjustments, personnel and training issues. To create CT and homeland security (HS) units and to staff fusion centers, law enforcement agencies made a number of organizational adjustments. The focus of training shifted from response to large-scale emergencies involving man-made or natural disasters to also include those involving terrorist threats; (3) framework for estimating the potential costs associated with CT and HS efforts. An analytic framework was developed for estimating some of the financial cost implications of CT and HS efforts at the local level; (4) funding issues. A trend has occurred for HS grants to adopt a regional approach to HS preparedness and response, which is illustrated by the Urban Area Security Initiative (UASI). The UASI assists participating jurisdictions in developing integrated regional systems for prevention, protection, response, and recovery; and (5) benefits associated with the long-term focus on CT and HS. A number of benefits are identified as associated with the long-term focus of Ct and HS, such as specialized tactical response units, fusion centers, equipment and technology, and relationship building with local community. Since the 9/11 terrorist attacks, the need for increased CT and HS efforts at the Federal, State, and local levels has taken the spotlight in public safety efforts. Tables, appendixes, and references
Date Created: January 5, 2011