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Committee on Law and Justice Core Support

Award Information

Award #
2009-IJ-CX-0034
Location
Status
Closed
Funding First Awarded
2009
Total funding (to date)
$1,195,633

Description of original award (Fiscal Year 2009, $250,000)

The Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ) will conduct an ongoing planning process to build a framework for future research, by reviewing and assessing what is known in criminal justice research, and identifying major questions that reamin to be answered in order to advance theory, science and practice. Under this grant, CLAJ will hold two meetings, one of which will include a half-day seminar. A paper may be commissioned or published materials may be included in agenda documents to inform the discussion.
nca/ncf

This award supports the work of the Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in areas of interest to the nation's criminal justice community and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ). CLAJ uses an objective deliberative process involving experts in a wide variety of fields to sort through scientific issues, evidence, and controversy in order to inform criminal justice policies, programs, and practices. Through an ongoing process, CLAJ reviews and assesses what is known in criminal justice research, and identifies major questions that remain to be answered in order to advance theory, science, and practice. During the period of this award, CLAJ will conduct two business meetings, oversee the development of two new panel studies as well as several ongoing studies, and provide one seminar on a topic agreed upon by the grantee in consultation with NIJ. A paper may be commissioned or materials published by Committee members or outside experts may be provided during the seminar. nca/ncf

While there is a considerable body of research that contributes scientific knowledge for the development of current state and Federal legislation and programs, the relatively low level of funding available for crime and justice research - especially juxtaposed to that available for program operations - has resulted in gaps in the overall research portfolio in criminal justice. The Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ) provides a mechanism for an objective and transparent deliberative process to sort through scientific issues and controversies associated with criminal justice policies, programs, and practices. In the next 12 months, CLAJ expects to convene two business meetings, a seminar whose topic will be determined in conjunction with NIJ, and oversight of new panel studies on critical topics in criminology. A paper may be commissioned or materials published by CLAJ members, and outside experts will be provided during the seminar.

This award is a supplement to award #2009-IJ-CX-0034.
nca/ncf

This project is for a 12-month award. During this period, the Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will hold two meetings, one of which will include a seminar, utilizing the National Academies' facilities in Washington, DC. The meetings will allow the Committee to monitor existing projects, develop plans for new projects, and explore research needs related to criminal justice in topic areas of interest to NIJ and the Committee. For the seminar, Committee members will be asked to discuss topics of interest to NIJ, CLAJ, and the general public. A paper may be commissioned or published materials may be included in agenda materials meant to inform the discussion. CLAJ will also develop proposals for consensus studies and workshops.

While there is a considerable body of research that contributes scientific knowledge for the development of current state and federal legislation and programs, the relatively low level of funding available for crime research, especially juxtaposed to that available for program operations, has resulted in gaps in the overall research portfolio in criminal justice. CLAJ can bring to the table a mechanism for an objective and transparent deliberative process to sort through scientific issues and controversies associated with criminal justice policies, programs, and practices. The work conducted under this award is expected to lead to new theoretical perspectives, newly developed proposals, and the provision of expert guidance to multiple panel studies and workshops in both existing and under-developed areas of criminal justice.

The funds dedicated to this award will allow CLAJ to conduct these activities and manage its existing and proposed workload, by supporting regular meetings and dedicated support staff. Through its work, CLAJ will assist NIJ in the development of its strategic plans and research programs by assessing current knowledge in crime prevention by providing scientific leadership in the exploration of emerging theories, concepts and policies; guiding the development, testing and evaluation of crime prevention and control practices; and encouraging the development of new programs in the area of criminal justice. During the award period, the Committee hopes to obtain funding for four new projects: Understanding the Crime Decline in America: A Proposal for a National Research Council Roundtable; Understanding Financial Fraud: Policy Responses and Research Needs; Bullying (in collaboration with the Board on Children, Youth and Families); and Capital Punishment Study: A Proposal to Assess the Evidence on Error and Arbitrariness in Administration of the Death Penalty. nca/ncf

NIJ proposes to provide financial support to the NAS standing Committee on Law and Justice (CLAJ). CLAJ was established to increase the scientific understanding of law and justice and assist in improving the operations of the justice system as a whole; identify new areas of research and knowledge gaps; aid in resolving scientific controversies; extend the research agenda in established areas; promote theory development; and advance research-based policies and practices. The committee accomplishes these tasks through presentations, workshops, seminars, symposia, and studies on various topics of interest to the field. There are two components to the project-operational support for CLAJ and one meeting. The operational support will allow CLAJ to hold one public meeting as well as conduct CLAJ business throughout the year in a series of private meetings. The meeting will include a major criminal justice topic determined jointly by CLAJ and NIJ leadership. NIJ uses these meetings to identity emerging issues, prioritize topics for further research and disseminate research findings. Typically, papers/presentations are commissioned by CLAJ for the meeting, are provided to NIJ, and are made available to the public. At the public meeting there is an opportunity for the NIJ Director to present his vision for NIJ, as well as issues, concerns, and general plans related to the work of the agency. Committee members respond with questions and an informal discussion to offer ideas, perspectives, and possible research strategies to the NIJ Director and other agency management and staff in attendance. nca/ncf

Date Created: September 28, 2009