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Desistance from crime

Victimization and Desistance From Crime

Date Published
2019
Publication Type
Research (Applied/Empirical), Report (Study/Research), Report (Grant Sponsored), Program/Project Description
Agencies
NIJ-Sponsored

NIJ FY 11 Research and Evaluation in Crime Control and Prevention: Desistance from Gangs and Gang Related Crime

Closing Date

NIJ is seeking applications to conduct research on selected crime control and prevention topics. This is a directed solicitation that seeks proposals to examine topics relevant to State, local, and/or tribal criminal and juvenile justice policy and practice.

The specific focus area under this solicitation for FY 2011 is desistance from gangs and gang related Crime

Going Home (or Not): How Residential Change Might Help Former Offenders Stay Out of Prison

October 2011

Dr. Kirk discusses how Hurricane Katrina affected ex-prisoners originally from New Orleans and their likelihood of returning to prison. Kirk also discussed potential strategies for fostering residential change among ex-prisoners, focusing specifically on parole residency policies and the provision of public housing vouchers.

Longitudinal Research on Delinquency and Crime, FY 2019

Closing Date

The Longitudinal Research on Delinquency and Crime solicitation is intended to support the expansion or extension of one or more ongoing/existing longitudinal research studies that focus on delinquency and crime throughout the life-course, which may include childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Applicants are encouraged to adopt a holistic approach to the study of child and adolescent development and the emergence, persistence, and desistance of delinquent and criminal offending.

Research into Desistance from Crime, FY 2019

Closing Date

With this solicitation, NIJ seeks to build upon its research efforts to understand and aid in accelerating the process of desistance from crime. Applicants should propose research projects that have clear implications for criminal justice policy and practice in the United States. NIJ encourages applicants to submit proposals for innovative approaches to advance the field's conceptualization of desistance, novel ways of understanding the processes underlying desistance from crime, and integrating desistance into criminal justice practice and policy.