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Office of Justice Programs (OJP)

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National Youth Gang Survey, Fiscal Year 2020

Closing Date

In collaboration with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), NIJ seeks proposals for funding to conduct a study of youth gangs. The award recipient will be expected to develop, test, and administer a national data collection from law enforcement agencies to produce accurate and reliable national estimates of, and information about youth gangs, and gang-related criminal activities and law enforcement approaches to dealing with those activities.

Protecting Against Stress & Trauma: Research Lessons for Law Enforcement– Defining the Problem

October 2019
At this Research for the Real World seminar, NIJ brought together law enforcement practitioners and leading researchers in the field of stress to discuss the current research evidence and practical benefits of targeted stress-management interventions and how they can promote officer mental wellness. In addition, this gathering provided an exploration into what additional research is needed to best support officer health and wellness, potentially highlighting priority areas for future research.

NIJ's Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science Academics Program

Notice

The 2019 application period has closed. 

The Law Enforcement Advancing Data and Science (LEADS) Academics program (currently in pilot) offers a unique opportunity for early-career academics to engage with NIJ LEADS Scholars, all of whom are mid-career police officers dedicated to advancing the police profession through science.

Applicant NEPA Process: Frequently Asked Questions

NEPA requires that prior to funding, authorizing, or implementing an action, federal agencies must consider the effects the proposed action may have on the environment, and the related social and economic effects. Under this legislation, Agencies are required to address each project, taking into account all consequences as well as the effect of cumulative impacts on the environment. Because NIJ must make a decision as to whether to fund your project, NEPA applies.

No. However, you are strongly encouraged to do so if the actions within your project are not Categorical Exclusions (CATEXs), especially if your project has required NEPA compliance documentation in the past or if it falls under any of the programs or project types that are within the scope of the Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA). See the NIJ CATEX page and the PEA page for more information.

Applicants are encouraged to submit their NIJ Grants Program Checklist with their project application package. If your project requires a NIJ Grants Program Checklist and you do not submit one with your application, the NIJ NEPA Coordinator or the Grant Manager assigned, will contact the POC listed on your application with a request to complete the checklist. Note, if the checklist is submitted later, it may hold up access to funds.

The POC listed on the application or a representative with knowledge of the project and approved by the POC.

The POC listed on the application or a representative with knowledge of the project and approved by the POC.

Depending on the work being outsourced, subcontractors/subrecipients must submit a NIJ Programmatic Cover Sheet and the NIJ Grants Program Checklist. This applies to any entity identified in the Budget Detail Worksheet that will be receiving funds through a sub-award or procurement contract. Ultimately, the completeness and accuracy of the subcontractor/subrecipient checklists is the responsibility of the prime.

If you believe that a question is not relevant to your particular project, respond “N/A” where appropriate. If you choose to respond “N/A” you are required to give an explanation in the comments section as to why the question is non-applicable to facilitate review of your response by the NIJ NEPA Team.

Special conditions are removed when the NIJ Grant Manager receives the final approved NIJ Grants Program Checklist, along with all necessary documentation required to comply with the DOJ Procedures for implementing NEPA found at 28 CFR Part 61 (Appendix D). This documentation is provided to the Grant Manager after it has been approved by the NIJ NEPA Coordinator. Once the Grant Manager and NIJ NEPA Coordinator have verified that the applicant has submitted all necessary documents and NEPA compliance is complete, then a Grant Adjustment Notice (GAN) will be issued removing the NEPA condition.

Yes, NIJ Grants Program Checklist are needed for each new award, not for each year of a multiple year award. If the project and activities have changed from the original application, then a new checklist may be required.

Project funds will be withheld until the NEPA requirement has been completed in full.

No, separate checklists are required for different projects/application numbers, even if they are being done by the same entity

NEPA is a federal law that applies to decisions NIJ makes about whether or not to fund a project. Therefore, the NIJ NEPA Coordinator makes the final decision on the appropriate level of NEPA compliance for your project and the determination of whether compliance with the requirements of NEPA has been achieved.

NIJ’s NEPA Coordinator and/or Grant Manager will be available to support the NEPA compliance process for your project.

Violence Against American Indian and Alaska Native Women and Men - 2010 Findings from the National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey

July 2016

This seminar provides the first set of estimates from a national large-scale survey of violence against women and men who identified themselves as American Indian or Alaska Native using detailed behaviorally specific questions on psychological aggression, coercive control and entrapment, physical violence, stalking, and sexual violence. These results are expected to raise awareness and understanding of violence experienced by American Indian and Alaska Native people.

Try Again, Fail Again, Fail Better: Lessons from Community Courts

April 2011

Change doesn't come easy, particularly within an institution as large and complex as the criminal justice system. Greg Berman, Director of the Center for Court Innovation, offered lessons from several efforts to make reform stick in criminal justice settings. In particular, he focused on the development of community courts — experimental court projects that are attempting to reduce both crime and incarceration in dozens of cities across the U.S. and around the world.

Violent Repeat Victimization: Prospects and Challenges for Research and Practice

April 2012

Research tells us that a relatively small fraction of individuals experience a large proportion of violent victimizations. Thus, focusing on reducing repeat victimization might have a large impact on total rates of violence. However, research also tells us that most violent crime victims do not experience more than one incident during a six-month or one-year time period. As a result, special policies to prevent repeat violence may not be cost-effective for most victims.

Nurse-Family Partnerships: From Trials to International Replication

January 2010

David Olds, founder of the Nurse-Family Partnership Program, describes the programs long-term impact on mothers and babies who began participating in the program more than 19 years ago. The Nurse-Family Partnership maternal health program introduces vulnerable first-time parents to maternal and child health nurses. It allows nurses to deliver the support first-time moms need to have a healthy pregnancy, become knowledgeable and responsible parents, and provide their babies and later children and young adults with the best possible start in life.

Less Prison, More Police, Less Crime: How Criminology Can Save the States from Bankruptcy

April 2010

Professor Lawrence Sherman explains how policing can prevent far more crimes than prison per dollar spent. His analysis of the cost-effectiveness of prison compared to policing suggests that states can cut their total budgets for justice and reduce crime by reallocating their spending on crime: less prison, more police.

The Evaluation of NIJ by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences: NIJ's Response

June 2011

The National Academies conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the National Institute of Justice. This panel provides an overview of the evaluation and NIJ's response to it. NIJ has accepted many of the recommendations in the NRC report, and you will learn what the agency is doing to implement them. A few of the recommendations were challenging and created considerable debate within NIJ. Plans to address these thorny issues also are discussed.

The Evaluation of NIJ by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences: NIJ's Response

June 2011

The National Academies conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the National Institute of Justice. This panel provides an overview of the evaluation and NIJ's response to it. NIJ has accepted many of the recommendations in the NRC report, and you will learn what the agency is doing to implement them. A few of the recommendations were challenging and created considerable debate within NIJ. Plans to address these thorny issues also are discussed.

The Evaluation of NIJ by the National Research Council of the National Academy of Sciences: NIJ's Response

June 2011

The National Academies conducted a comprehensive evaluation of the National Institute of Justice. This panel provides an overview of the evaluation and NIJ's response to it. NIJ has accepted many of the recommendations in the NRC report, and you will learn what the agency is doing to implement them. A few of the recommendations were challenging and created considerable debate within NIJ. Plans to address these thorny issues also are discussed.