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Alternative Sentencing Policies for Drug Offenders

June, 2009

The panel presentations from the 2009 NIJ Conference are based on an NIJ-sponsored evaluation of the effectiveness of Kansas Senate Bill 123, which mandates community-based drug abuse treatment for drug possession by nonviolent offenders in lieu of prison. 

Alternative Sentencing Policies for Drug Offenders

June, 2009

The panel presentations from the 2009 NIJ Conference are based on an NIJ-sponsored evaluation of the effectiveness of Kansas Senate Bill 123, which mandates community-based drug abuse treatment for drug possession by nonviolent offenders in lieu of prison. 

Sex Offenders in the Community: Post-Release, Registration, Notification and Residency Restrictions

May, 2010

The management of sexual offenders in the community post-release is an issue of increasing concern to law enforcement, policymakers and the public. In recent years, efforts to strengthen registration and notification have been enhanced. At the same time, comparatively little attention has been paid to related matters, such as how residency restrictions may impact offenders' efforts to find stable work and living arrangements once they are released from prison, whether rates of recidivism have changed, and whether these policies increase the safety of potential victims.

Sex Offenders in the Community: Post-Release, Registration, Notification and Residency Restrictions

May, 2010

The management of sexual offenders in the community post-release is an issue of increasing concern to law enforcement, policymakers and the public. In recent years, efforts to strengthen registration and notification have been enhanced. At the same time, comparatively little attention has been paid to related matters, such as how residency restrictions may impact offenders' efforts to find stable work and living arrangements once they are released from prison, whether rates of recidivism have changed, and whether these policies increase the safety of potential victims.

Program Services Under the Second Chance Act

Sidebar to the article 'Cultural Shift' Is Among Findings of Second Chance Act Evaluation by Nancy Ritter

In addition to case management services, the 10 Second Chance Act sites evaluated by NIJ-funded researchers deliver re-entry services that fall into these basic categories:

The National Institute of Justice SORNA Challenge: Developing Strategies to Measure the Implementation Costs and Public Safety Benefits of the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA)

Challenge Closed

This challenge has closed. This page is kept available for informational purposes.
We would like to thank everyone who submitted an idea under this Challenge. We know our Challenge questions are tough, and in this case, no submission met the Challenge, so we will not award a prize.

On this page find:

Second Chance Act: What Have We Learned About Reentry Programs So Far?

June, 2013

June 2013
Interview with Ron D'Amico, Social Policy Research Associates

Offender reentry into the community is a pressing social problem. The number of inmates released every year from the nation's prisons increased fourfold over the past three decades.

Since the Second Chance Act (SCA) was passed in 2008, more than $250 million has been awarded to government agencies and non-profits for programs to help offenders successfully reenter society. NIJ is doing an in-depth study of 10 sites to determine the effectiveness of these reentry programs.