U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government, Department of Justice.

Dot gov

The .gov means it’s official.
Federal government websites always use a .gov or .mil domain. Before sharing sensitive information online, make sure you’re on a .gov or .mil site by inspecting your browser’s address (or “location”) bar.

Https

The site is secure.
The https:// ensures that you are connecting to the official website and that any information you provide is encrypted and transmitted securely.

Technical assistance

Select Filters

Fighting the Opioid Crisis

Convening Police Leaders and Researchers to Learn Promising Practices and to Inform Research Agenda

Director Muhlhausen's prepared remarks at the NIJ-hosted Opioid Research Summit.

NIJ Director David B. Muhlhausen at the podium

NIJ Director Muhlhausen

Supporting Forensic Science Is a Priority at the National Institute of Justice

I have dedicated my life to understanding and preventing violence. From my training as a physician, working on violence prevention at the Centers for Disease Control, and now at NIJ, I have seen the contribution of science to our understanding of how to prevent and address violence and its consequences.

NIJ helped changed the landscape of forensic science through our support of research and development to advance the collection and analysis of forensic DNA. Now we are poised to do the same for other forensic disciplines.

Director’s Corner: How We Can Learn From Errors Within Criminal Justice

Every year, there are millions of interactions between the public and the criminal justice system. Most of those interactions result in a legitimate or just outcome. However, that is not always the case. In the relatively rare instances when the outcome is not legitimate or just, it can be devastating for individuals, families, communities, and criminal justice professionals.

As with any complex system of agencies, the criminal justice system is complex, has flaws, and requires mechanisms to understand these outcomes and prevent them from recurring.

Prosecuting Cases of Elder Abuse

June, 2010

This panel will feature NIJ-funded research that has direct, practical implications for the prosecution of elder abuse cases. Panelists will present findings from a study of prosecutors in three states that examined the factors that influenced their decisions to prosecute elder financial abuse cases. The panel will also provide the results from an evaluation of five innovative court-based models that target perpetrators of elder abuse.

Director's Message: Elevating Practitioners — From Advisers to Participants to Drivers

I started my tenure at NIJ with a commitment to getting out into the field to ensure NIJ stays connected. And I restate that commitment here.

From my very first day as the Director of the National Institute of Justice, I have made elevating the role of the practitioner a priority in everything we do. Our research must be connected to and serve the needs of the field. To ensure this, we listen to the needs of the field and encourage their participation in our funded research and evaluation projects.

Applying for Funding: About Online Applications and the SF-424

With few exceptions, applications must be submitted to NIJ online through Grants.gov. Paper copies are not accepted.

Grants.gov. NIJ strongly encourages potential applicants to begin the application process as soon as possible, especially if you are a first-time user. Instructions for applying using Grants.gov are available at Get Registered on Grants.gov. For assistance with the electronic application process, call Grants.gov technical support at 1-800-518-4726.

OJP Grants Management System (GMS). When indicated in the solicitation, applications must be submitted through the online GMS. We suggest that you begin the process early, especially if this is the first time you have used the system. Each application requires a separate GMS registration. To learn how to begin the online application process, go to OJP's GMS Training and Technical Assistance. For additional information, please call the GMS Help Desk at 1-888-549-9901.

The registration process can take 1 to 3 weeks depending on your organization. Many factors contribute to this timeframe. See Get Registered on Grants.gov for details and instructions.
Grants Management System. About 3 to 5 days, but you should begin the application process as soon as possible, especially if you are a first-time user. For assistance with the electronic application process, call the GMS toll-free hotline at 1-888-549-9901. The hotline is available from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. eastern time, Monday through Friday.

On G​rants.gov, go to Search Grant Opportunities on Grants.gov.

On the OJP Grants Management System, go to "OJP Application Process." This site links users directly to GMS and the GMS Application Procedures Handbook, which gives step-by-step instructions. Click on the solicitation that interests you. Then select "Logon directly to the Grants Management System (GMS)" to apply for grant funding. If you have not previously used GMS, click on "New User? Register Here" and follow the onscreen instructions to register. After you register, select the name of the solicitation you are responding to.

Grants.gov and Grants Management System. You will need a Dun and Bradstreet (D&B) Data Universal Numbering System (DUNS) number to register. Your application will not be considered complete until you provide a valid DUNS number.

EXCEPTION: Individuals who would personally receive a grant or cooperative agreement from the Federal Government apart from any business or nonprofit organization that they may operate are not required to obtain a DUNS number. If this exception applies, enter any nine digits into the space provided.

You can receive a DUNS number at no cost by calling the dedicated toll-free DUNS number request line at 1-866-705-5711. If you have questions, contact OJP's Office of the Chief Financial Officer's Customer Service Center at 1-800-458-0786.

Grants.gov has additional registration requirements. See Get Registered on Grants.gov for details.

Only if your password has expired.

Yes.

No. You can submit a collaborative proposal but it must be a single application and the award would be made to a single agency, which would have to establish means to fund the collaborating agencies.

Yes. However, the person in your organization who has signing authority to accept Federal grant funds is your organization's Authorized Representative (also referred to as the Signing Authority). This person must be empowered to receive funds on behalf of the organization and must be legally authorized to enter into agreements on the organization's behalf. If you are not the Authorized Representative, you must enter information about that person when you register.

If a single point of contact for your State is listed on the OJP Applicant Information Regarding Intergovernmental Reviews , then your application is subject to review.

No. The start date is the date you estimate that work on the proposed project will begin. Thus, your start date should be at least 6 months after the closing date of the solicitation to allow for NIJ's decision- and award-making processes.

See the specific solicitation to which you are applying for any file type limitations.

Grants.gov. The number of files you can upload to Grants.gov varies depending on the application package.

Grants Management System. GMS now allows you to upload any number of files. Please reference the specific solicitation for details on what must be included in your uploaded files.