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Social sciences

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Economical Crime Control: Perspectives from Both Sides of the Ledger

November, 2001

The surge in incarceration since 1980 has been fueled in part by the mistaken belief that the population can be divided neatly into "good guys" and "bad guys." In fact, crime rates are not determined by the number of at-large criminals, any more than farm production is determined by the number of farmers. Crime is a choice, a choice that is influenced by available opportunities as much as by character. This perspective, drawn from economic theory, supports a multi-faceted approach to crime control. Dr.

What Is Research and Evaluation Evidence and How Can We Use It?

June, 2010

This NIJ Conference Panel will explore the development and use of evidence-based policies, programs and technologies to improve effectiveness and efficiencies related to government. Through casual observation, practices and programs may appear to be effective, but under closer scrutiny the results may look much different.

Director's Message: Countering Violent Extremism with Research

At NIJ, we are dedicated to conducting and applying research in our efforts to find solutions to criminal justice problems. A great example of that dedication is exhibited in our robust research portfolio on domestic radicalization and countering violent extremism (CVE). NIJ has invested in almost two dozen research projects that aim to 1) understand how and why individuals radicalize to violence and 2) identify promising practices for prevention and intervention.

Director's Message: Decades of Research Provide Guidance on Police Wellness

One of the most significant — but least understood — realities of research in the social and behavioral sciences is how difficult it can be to identify specific, causal relationships, especially when examining the impact of a particular program. In fact, in all the sciences, small incremental progress is far more common than breakthroughs. That’s why I’m so pleased when I see examples of NIJ’s role in driving innovative research in policing and other stressful occupations, such as serving in the military or on crisis intervention teams.

Director's Message: New Research Projects Funded in Fiscal Year 2015

One of NIJ’s most crucial tasks as a science agency is making decisions about which research proposals to fund. I’m pleased to report that for fiscal year 2015, NIJ made over $156 million in grant awards to more than 210 research projects. These awards reflect NIJ’s commitment to funding rigorous research that helps practitioners and policymakers make criminal justice decisions based on sound scientific evidence.  

Sex Offenders in the Community: Post-Release, Registration, Notification and Residency Restrictions

May, 2010

The management of sexual offenders in the community post-release is an issue of increasing concern to law enforcement, policymakers and the public. In recent years, efforts to strengthen registration and notification have been enhanced. At the same time, comparatively little attention has been paid to related matters, such as how residency restrictions may impact offenders' efforts to find stable work and living arrangements once they are released from prison, whether rates of recidivism have changed, and whether these policies increase the safety of potential victims.

John H. Laub, Ph.D.

Title
Former Director, National Institute of Justice
Office (OJP)
Office of the Director

A Tribute to Herman Goldstein, George Kelling and James Q. Wilson: Contributions to the Field of Criminal Justice

John H. Laub, NIJ Director

I am faced with an impossible task: 10 minutes to honor Herman Goldstein, George Kelling and James Q. Wilson for their contributions to the field. Gee, it would be easier to travel to Boston for a meeting in the middle of January! Did that memo from Chris Stone and Christine Cole last month really say, "There is no snow on the ground yet?" I lived in Boston for 18 years ... why would you tempt the snow gods?

Establishment of a National Center on Restorative Justice, FY2019

Closing Date

Within the funds available for the NIJ, the Committee provides $3,000,000 for NIJ to enter into a partnership with an accredited university of higher education and/or law school for the purposes of establishing a National Center on Restorative Justice with the purpose of (1) educating and training the next generation of justice leaders. The Center shall also (2) support research focusing on how best to provide direct services to address social inequities, such as simultaneous access to substance abuse treatment and higher education.

About the NIJ Office of Research, Evaluation, and Technology

The Office of Research, Evaluation, and Technology (ORET) within NIJ encourages and supports research, development and evaluation to further the understanding of:

  • Causes and correlates of crime and violence.
  • Methods of crime prevention and control.
  • Criminal justice system responses to crime and violence.

Through ORET, NIJ contributes to the improvement of the criminal and juvenile justice systems and their responses to crime, violence, and delinquency.