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Evaluating Treatment Drug Courts in Kansas City, Missouri and Pensacola, Florida: Final Reports for Phase I and Phase II

NCJ Number
198477
Date Published
Author(s)
Truitt, L.; Rhodes, WM.; Hoffman, NG.; Seeherman, AM.; Kuck-Jalbert, S.; Kane, M.; Bacani, CP.; Carrigan, KM.; and Finn, P.
Annotation
This report contains an evaluation of adult treatment drug court programs in two phases, at two sites, Escambia County, Florida and Jackson County, Missouri.
Abstract
This report provides an overview of the research design and findings pertaining to the case studies, the impact evaluations, and problem status modeling. The first phase of this evaluation involved a retrospective study of case studies and impact evaluations that covered cohorts from 1993 to 1997, assessing the effects of the drug courts on criminal recidivism measured as the probability of, and time until, first rearrest. Phase I also contains a review of the literature. Phase II covered the cohort of 256 participants, from both Jackson County and Escambia, who entered the drug courts between October 1999 and October 2000, a prospective study that involved program retention models and descriptive analyses. A separate technical report was created for each phase, intended to be complementary and read in conjunction with the evaluations. Methods of study used include logistic regression and survival analysis; interview and self-reports; documentation of program development, policies and procedure, case flow, and lessons learned. It was found that both programs were successful in reducing recidivism rates, with Jackson County having increased time until rearrest with increased participation in the program there. Demographics, such as age, employment, gender, race/ethnicity were found to best predict program status, whether active or graduate. Treatment motivation, alcohol and other drug use and dependency, and mental health varied in influence as predictors and also varied in influence by site. In conclusion, it was found that the drug courts did lower criminal recidivism by 18 percent in Escambia county and by 15 percent in Jackson County.
Date Created: July 31, 2003